Resources

Here are some links and resources that Dr. Imber and her patients and colleagues have found helpful. They will lead you to a wealth of information about neuropsychology, psychological and neurological disorders, and organizations that provide support for patients and families. There is also information about how to use your insurance and access your benefits to get assessment and care.
Dr. Imber is not responsible for the content of external resources; in particular, some internet sites are moderated less closely than others.  Not all resources will be appropriate for everyone. Please use them at your own discretion. All quotations are taken from the respective websites. If there is a broken link or any other problem with the information on this page, or if you would like to suggest more resources to add, please contact us here.

Information By Diagnosis and Issue (arranged alphabetically):

     

  • Anxiety
    Relevant Links:
    -http://www.anxiety.org, a collection of resources sponsored by the UCLA Anxiety Disorders Program. 

    Other Reading Material:
    -If Your Adolescent Has an Anxiety Disorder, a free, downloadable e-book for parents.
    -What You Must Think of Me, a free, downloadable e-book for teens with Social Anxiety Disorder.

  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • Asperger’s Syndrome, Autism, and other Pervasive Developmental Disorders (see also Non-Verbal Learning Disability)
    Relevant Links:
    -The Asperger’s Association of New England (AANE): Terrific community offering patient groups and other resources to individuals with Asperger’s and their families.
    -Autism Speaks: This organization identifies itself as “the nation’s largest autism science and advocacy organization, dedicated to funding research into the causes, prevention, treatments and a cure for autism; increasing awareness of autism spectrum disorders; and advocating for the needs of individuals with autism and their families.”
    -Tony Attwood’s website. Dr. Attwood is a leading expert on Asperger’s Syndrome. He makes much information about AS and related conditions freely available on his excellent website.
    -Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) Factsheet. National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY)‘s out-of-print fact sheet about PDD-NOS, still available for download as a PDF. 

    Other Reading Material:
    -The Complete Guide to Asperger’s Syndrome, by Tony Attwood
    -Asperger’s And Girls, by Tony Attwood, Temple Grandin, et al.
    -All Cats Have Asperger Syndrome, by Kathy Hoopmann
    -Helping a Child with Nonverbal Learning Disorder or Asperger’s Syndrome: A Parent’s Guide, by Kathryn Stewart
    -Nonverbal Learning Disabilities at Home: A Parent’s Guide, by Pamela Tanguay
    -Nonverbal Learning Disabilities at School: Educating Students with NLD, Asperger Syndrome, and Related Disorders by Pamela Tanguay
    -Pretending to be Normal: Living With Asperger’s Syndrome, Liane Holliday Willey and Tony Attwood

  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • Alzheimer’s Disease and other Dementias
    Relevant Links:
    -Alzheimer’s Association: A nonprofit organization that offers support to patients and caregivers, funds research about Alzheimer’s and its treatment, and promotes brain health.
    -The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD): A group offering support and information to families, caregivers, patients, and professionals who are affected by Fronto-Temporal Dementia (FTD). 

    Other Reading Material:
    -Harvard Medical School Guide to Achieving Optimal Memory, by Aaron P. Nelson, Ph.D. and Susan Gilbert.
    -The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for Persons with Alzheimer Disease, Related Dementing Illnesses, and Memory Loss in Later Life, by Nancy L. Mace, M.A. and Peter V. Rabins, M.P.H., M.D.

  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Executive Functioning
    Relevant Links:
    -Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD): This organization offers information about living with ADHD. 

    Other Reading Material:
    For Students with ADHD and Their Parents:
    -A Kid’s Guide to Organizing, by Jarrett G. Carter, Jolene T. Carter, and Janae J. Carter
    -Smart But Scattered:  The Revolutionary “Executive Skills” Approach to Helping Kids Reach Their Potential, by Peg Dawson, Ed.D. and Richard Guare, Ph.D.
    -Parenting Children with ADHD: Ten Lessons that Medicine Cannot Teach, by Vincent J. Monastra, Ph.D.
    -Learning Outside the Lines: Two Ivy Students with Learning Disabilities and ADHD Give You The Tools, by Jonathan Mooney, David Cole, and Edward M. Hallowell, M.D.
    -Where’s My Stuff? The Ultimate Teen Organizing Guide, by Samantha Moss, Lesley Schwartz, and Michael Wurtz
    -Help4ADD@HighSchool, by Kathleen G. Nadeau, Ph.D.
    -Learning to Slow Down and Pay Attention, by Kathleen G. Nadeau, Ph.D. and Ellen B. Dixon, Ph.D.
    -Survival Guide for College Students With ADHD or L.D., by Kathleen G. Nadeau, Ph.D.
    -The Survival Guide for Kids with ADD or ADHD, by John F. Taylor, Ph.D.

    For Adults with ADHD:
    -How to Get Organized When You Don’t Have the Time, by Stephanie Culp
    -Driven to Distraction: Recognizing and Coping With Attention Deficit Disorder From Childhood Through Adulthood, by Edward M. Hallowell and John J. Ratey
    -YOU MEAN I’M NOT LAZY, STUPID OR CRAZY?!: A Self-help Book for Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder, by Kate Kelly and Peggy Ramundo
    -ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life, by Judith Kolberg and Kathleen Nadeau
    -Scattered: How ADHD Originates and What You Can Do About It, by Gabor Maté
    -Survival Tips for Women with AD/HD: Beyond Piles, Palms and Post-Its, by Terry Matlen
    -Organizing from the Inside Out (2nd edition), by Julie Morgenstern
    -Understanding Women with ADHD, by Kathleen G. Nadeau
    -Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain, by John J. Ratey, M.D. and Eric Hagerman
    -The Disorganized Mind: Coaching your ADHD Brain to Take Control of Your Time, Tasks, and Talents, by Nancy Ratey
    -Women with Attention Deficit Disorder: Embrace Your Differences and Transform Your Life, by Sari Solden
    -The Organized Executive: A Program for Productivity—New Ways to Manage Time, Paper, People, and the Electronic Office (Revised Edition), by Stephanie Winston

  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • Borderline Personality
    Relevant Links:
    -National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder (NEA-BPD): NEA-BPD is “a non-profit organization staffed by volunteering consumers, family members, and professionals. NEA-BPD seeks to “Advance the BPD Agenda” by raising public awareness of BPD, providing education, and promoting research about borderline personality disorder through a variety of programs.” 

    Other Reading Material:
    -New Hope for People with Borderline Personality Disorder: Your Friendly, Authoritative Guide to the Latest in Traditional and Complementary Solutions, by Neil R. Bockian, Ph.D., Valerie Porr, M.A., and Nora Elizabeth Villagran, M.A.
    -The Essential Family Guide to Borderline Personality Disorder: New Tools and Techniques to Stop Walking on Eggshells, by Randi Kreger
    -Sometimes I Act Crazy: Living With Borderline Personality Disorder, by Jerold J. Kreisman, M.D. and Hal Straus
    -Stop Walking on Eggshells: Taking Your Life Back When Someone You Care About Has Borderline Personality Disorder, by Paul T. Mason, M.S. and Randi Kreger

  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • Depression, Bipolar Disorder, and other Mood Problems
    Relevant Links:
    -Depression-Bipolar Support Alliance of Boston (DBSA-Boston): Formerly MDDA-Boston, this group is “…a non-profit, self-help organization run by and for people with affective disorders such as depression and bipolar disorder. DBSA members come together to share support and information with others in similar situations.”
    -National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI):NAMI identifies itself as “the most formidable grassroots mental health advocacy organization in the country. Dedication, steadfast commitment and unceasing belief in NAMI’s mission by grassroots advocates have produced profound changes. NAMI’s greatest strength is the dedication of our grassroots leaders and members. We are the families, friends and individuals that serve to strengthen communities across the country.” They contribute to education, support, and advocacy, and research efforts. 

    Other Reading Material:
    -Eight Stories Up: An Adolescent Chooses Hope Over Suicide, a free, downloadable e-book for teens about suicidal thoughts.
    -Mind Race: A Firsthand Account of One Teenager’s Experience With Bipolar Disorder, a free, downloadable e-book for teens about bipolar.
    -Monochrome Days: A Firsthand Account of One Teenager’s Experience with Depression, another free, downloadable e-book for teens about depression.
    -If Your Adolescent Has Depression or Bipolar Disorder: An Essential Resource for Parents, a free, downloadable e-book for parents of kids with mood disorders.

  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • Dyslexia (Reading Disorder) (see also Learning Disabilities)
    Relevant Links:
    The International Dyslexia Association: This group works to promote literacy, advance the field of dyslexia research, and offer supports to individuals with dyslexia and their families.
    -The Orton-Gillingham method of reading instruction is based upon multi-sensory approaches to teaching reading decoding.
    -The Wilson Reading System is a step-by-step method for teaching struggling readers by using multi-sensory methods, based upon the Orton-Gillingham principles.
    -The Lindamood-Bell Program, which includes the Lindamood Phoneme Sequencing Program (LiPS), is another innovative method for teaching students with severe decoding difficulties.
    -Read Naturally is a reading program for older students.
    -Great Leaps is another reading program for older students.
    -Lexia Learning Systems SOS (Strategies for Older Students) is software that focuses on improving decoding efficiency by teaching prefixes, suffixes, and root words in both Latin and Greek.
    -Learning Ally (formerly Reading for the Blind and Dyslexic) offers textbooks and other reading material on special CDs, which have a navigation system and may require a special player. They also offer MP3 books. A list of available material is on their website; if something is not there, you can even ask that it be recorded for you by volunteers!
    -The Massachusetts Adult Literacy Hotline can be reached at 1-800-447-8844, or on the internet at this site.
    -The Perkins Talking Book Library serves individuals with dyslexia as well as those with visual impairment. Membership is free, but you must contact them for an application. Books on CD can be ordered online.
    -audible.com offers MP3 audiobooks for purchase at reasonable rates, with monthly and yearly subscription plans.
    -LibriVox.org offers free audiobooks in MP3 format for books in the public domain, read by volunteers. This is a great way to get through required reading of classic books; listen while you follow along for the best benefits to your decoding and word-recognition abilities.
    -Don’t forget to check your local library for free audiobooks to download or borrow on CD! 

    Other Reading Material: (use electronic readers or audiobook versions to improve comprehension!)
    -Overcoming Dyslexia: A New and Complete Science-Based Program for Reading Problems at Any Level, by Sally E. Shaywitz, M.D.

  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • General Resources
    Relevant Links:
    -CopeCareDeal: Part of the Adolescent Mental Health Initiative of the Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands. This website is geared for teens with mental illnesses, including depression, bipolar disorder, eating disorders, OCD, anxiety, social anxiety, schizophrenia, and a variety of other conditions. This site offers free books for teens and parents about teen mental illness that can be downloaded as PDFs, as well as discussion forums and other resources.
    -National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI):NAMI identifies itself as “the most formidable grassroots mental health advocacy organization in the country. Dedication, steadfast commitment and unceasing belief in NAMI’s mission by grassroots advocates have produced profound changes. NAMI’s greatest strength is the dedication of our grassroots leaders and members. We are the families, friends and individuals that serve to strengthen communities across the country.” They contribute to education, support, and advocacy, and research efforts.
    -National Dissemination Center for Children With Disabilities (NICHCY): This organization offers a treasure trove of information about accessing resources for disabilities, including LD, with links to information about educational rights.
  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • Intermittent Explosive Disorder/Unpredictable Tantrums
    Reading Material:
    -The Explosive Child, by Ross Greene, Ph.D.
  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • Learning Disabilities
    Relevant Links:
    -Learning Disabilities Association of America: A national group with local chapters, LDA offers resources and support to parents, teachers, students, and adults with LD.
    -National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD): NCLD’s self-stated goal is to grant all kids “the power to hope, to learn and to succeed.” Their resources are aimed at helping people of all ages to cope with learning disabilities.
    -National Dissemination Center for Children With Disabilities (NICHCY): This organization offers a treasure trove of information about accessing resources for disabilities, including LD, with links to information about educational rights. 

    Other Reading Material:
    -Learning Outside the Lines: Two Ivy Students with Learning Disabilities and ADHD Give You The Tools, by Jonathan Mooney, David Cole, and Edward M. Hallowell, M.D.

  • Back to List of Diagnoses


  • Non-Verbal Learning Disability (NLD or NVLD) (see also Asperger’s and Pervasive Developmental Disorders and Learning Disabilities)

  • Relevant Links:
    -Byron Rourke’s website: Dr. Rourke was a leading expert about the NLD diagnosis.
    -nldline.com, Judy Lewis’s collection of resources about Non-Verbal Learning Disability (NLD or NVLD).

    Other Reading Material:
    -Helping a Child with Nonverbal Learning Disorder or Asperger’s Syndrome: A Parent’s Guide, by Kathryn Stewart
    -Nonverbal Learning Disabilities at Home: A Parent’s Guide, by Pamela Tanguay
    -Nonverbal Learning Disabilities at School: Educating Students with NLD, Asperger Syndrome, and Related Disorders by Pamela Tanguay

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  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
    Relevant Links:
    The International OCD Foundation: This group is “an international not-for-profit organization made up of people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and related disorders, as well as their families, friends, professionals and others.” They offer advocacy, connections with specialists, information, and support. 

    Other Reading Material:
    -The Thought That Counts: A Firsthand Account of One Young Person’s Experience With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, a free, downloadable e-book for teens.
    -If Your Adolescent Has an Anxiety Disorder, a free, downloadable e-book for parents.
    -What To Do When Your Brain Gets Stuck: A Kid’s Guide to Overcoming OCD, by Dawn Huebner, Ph.D.
    -Brain Lock: Free Yourself from Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior, by Jeffrey M. Schwartz and Beverly Bayette

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  • Sensory Defensiveness (Also called Sensory Processing Disorder or Sensory Integration Disorder)
    Relevant Links:
    -A web search for “sensory toys” will turn up many places to purchase “fidget toys” and other components of a sensory “diet.” Shop around; some of the classics, like Silly Putty, can be found quite cheaply on large sites such as amazon.com

    Other Reading Material:
    -The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping With Sensory Processing Disorder, by Carol Stock Kranowitz, M.A.
    -Too Loud, Too Bright, Too Fast, Too Tight: What to Do If You Are Sensory Defensive in an Overstimulating World, by Sharon Heller

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  • Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease
    Relevant Links:
    American Stroke Association: Affiliated with the American Heart Association, this organization offers education about prevention, resources for stroke victims and their families, and links to local supports. They have two chapters in Massachusetts, including a Boston-area chapter

    Other Reading Material:
    -Life After Stroke: The Guide to Recovering Your Health and Preventing Another Stroke, by Joel Stein, M.D., Julie K. Silver, M.D., and Elizabeth Pegg Frates, M.D.

  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • Technology for People with Special Needs
    A collection of assistive and educational technology resources, in the form of a wiki; assembled by Karen Janowski, an occupational therapist with a specialty in adaptive technology and its role in education.
  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • Tics and Tourette’s Syndrome
    Relevant Links:
    -The Tourette Syndrome Association of Massachusetts (TSA-MA): TSA-MA is “an all volunteer, non-profit organization whose mission is to support the needs of families affected by Tourette Syndrome” by providing education, advocating for people with TS, and raising the public’s awareness. This free online video is also available from TSA as a DVD and addresses “Tourette Syndrome in the Classroom, School, and Community.” The video has great information about addressing Tourette Syndrome and related conditions (including OCD, handwriting problems, social delays, and ADHD) in the classroom setting and beyond. You can also download this accompanying set of slides at no charge.
    -www.tourettesyndrome.net is the website of Leslie Packer, Ph.D., a specialist in Tourette Syndrome and related disorders. She has gathered some useful resources for patients and families. 

    Other Reading Material:
    -Tics and Tourette Syndrome: A Handbook for Parents and Professionals, by Uttom Chowdhury
    -Children With Tourette’s Syndrome: A Parent’s Guide, edited by Tracy Lynne Marsh

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  • Traumatic Brain Injury
    Relevant Links:
    -Brain Injury Association of Massachusetts: A not-for-profit organization that provides support groups, education, and other information to people and families whose lives have been affected by brain injuries. Affiliated with the Brain Injury Association of America.
    -The Statewide Head Injury Program, or SHIP, offers state benefits and free programs related to traumatic brain injury. Information is offered on the Mass Rehab website (through the Department of Health and Human Services); a search for “Statewide Head Injury Program” will bring up the link. The Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission website says, “Anyone may request an application by calling (617) 204-3852 or (800) 223-2559 or by sending an e-mail to SHIPU@mrc.state.ma.us.” 

    Other Reading Material:
    -Where is the Mango Princess? A Journey Back from Brain Injury, by Cathy Crimmins (an autobiographical account from the perspective of a woman whose husband suffered a TBI)

  • Back to List of Diagnoses

  • Word-Finding Difficulty/Expressive Language Disorders
    -Flip Dictionary by Barbara Ann Kipfer, Ph.D. (A kind of reverse dictionary that lets you look up words based upon what you know about them.)
  • Back to List of Diagnoses

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Psychological and Neuropsychological Organizations
These professional organizations were formed to represent psychologists and neuropsychologists, but they also offer lots of information geared towards the general public.

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Patient Advocacy and Support Organizations
Whatever issues you and your loved ones may be facing, remember that you are not alone! These web pages for local and national groups can help to connect you with information about a diagnosis, ways to get involved in advocacy, support groups, up-to-the-minute news, how to raise awareness, and more.

  • Alzheimer’s Association: A nonprofit organization that offers support to patients and caregivers, funds research about Alzheimer’s and its treatment, and promotes brain health.
  • American Stroke Association: Affiliated with the American Heart Association, this organization offers education about prevention, resources for stroke victims and their families, and links to local supports. They have two chapters in Massachusetts, including a Boston-area chapter.
  • The Asperger’s Association of New England (AANE): Terrific community offering patient groups and other resources to individuals with Asperger’s and their families.
  • The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD): A group offering support and information to families, caregivers, patients, and professionals who are affected by Fronto-Temporal Dementia (FTD).
  • Autism Speaks: This organization identifies itself as “the nation’s largest autism science and advocacy organization, dedicated to funding research into the causes, prevention, treatments and a cure for autism; increasing awareness of autism spectrum disorders; and advocating for the needs of individuals with autism and their families.”
  • Brain Injury Association of Massachusetts: A not-for-profit organization that provides support groups, education, and other information to people and families whose lives have been affected by brain injuries. Affiliated with the Brain Injury Association of America.
  • Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD): This organization offers information about living with ADHD.
  • CopeCareDeal: Part of the Adolescent Mental Health Initiative of the Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands. This website is geared for teens with mental illnesses, including depression, bipolar disorder, eating disorders, OCD, anxiety, social anxiety, schizophrenia, and a variety of other conditions. This site offers free books for teens and parents about teen mental illness that can be downloaded as PDFs, as well as discussion forums and other resources.
  • Depression-Bipolar Support Alliance of Boston (DBSA-Boston): Formerly MDDA-Boston, this group is “…a non-profit, self-help organization run by and for people with affective disorders such as depression and bipolar disorder. DBSA members come together to share support and information with others in similar situations.”
  • The International Dyslexia Association: This group works to promote literacy, advance the field of dyslexia research, and offer supports to individuals with dyslexia and their families.
  • The International OCD Foundation: This group is “an international not-for-profit organization made up of people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and related disorders, as well as their families, friends, professionals and others.” They offer advocacy, connections with specialists, information, and support.
  • Learning Disabilities Association of America: A national group with local chapters, LDA offers resources and support to parents, teachers, students, and adults with LD.
  • National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI):NAMI identifies itself as “the most formidable grassroots mental health advocacy organization in the country. Dedication, steadfast commitment and unceasing belief in NAMI’s mission by grassroots advocates have produced profound changes. NAMI’s greatest strength is the dedication of our grassroots leaders and members. We are the families, friends and individuals that serve to strengthen communities across the country.” They contribute to education, support, and advocacy, and research efforts.
  • National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD): NCLD’s self-stated goal is to grant all kids “the power to hope, to learn and to succeed.” Their resources are aimed at helping people of all ages to cope with learning disabilities.
  • National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder (NEA-BPD): NEA-BPD is “a non-profit organization staffed by volunteering consumers, family members, and professionals. NEA-BPD seeks to “Advance the BPD Agenda” by raising public awareness of BPD, providing education, and promoting research about borderline personality disorder through a variety of programs.”
  • National Multiple Sclerosis Society: An organization that advocates for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), funds research, and offers many resources.
  • The Tourette Syndrome Association of Massachusetts (TSA-MA): TSA-MA is “an all volunteer, non-profit organization whose mission is to support the needs of families affected by Tourette Syndrome” by providing education, advocating for people with TS, and raising the public’s awareness.

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Helpful Tools

Charts and Logs: Great tools for finding patterns in your sleep, mood, and other symptoms. Nowadays, there are a variety of “apps” and spreadsheets available if you prefer to track information electronically; here are some sample paper versions for those who prefer the low-tech approach.

  • Mood Monitors for Bipolar Disorder: Sample, colorful mood-monitoring sheet aimed at tracking the symptoms of bipolar disorder. Downloadable as Adobe PDFs. Includes instructions for completion and a sample log.
  • Mood Monitor for Depression: Has a graph format along with a place to make comments and keep track of sleep. Downloadable as an Adobe PDF.
  • Sleep Log for Parents: Complete to track your child’s sleep patterns.
  • Weekly Sleep Log: Track your sleep habits each week, and rate the quality of your sleep.
  • Sleep Log for Teens: Adolescent sleep log with simple graphics to chart patterns.
  • Thought and Mood Monitors: Very useful in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety, depression, personality disorders, and many other issues. For maximum benefit, use these with the help of your therapist who can help you to interpret the patterns that may unfold.

Insurance Tools: If you live in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and subscribe to health insurance, you have many rights. Several consumer organizations exist to help you with understanding health care laws, filing appeals, and explaining your benefits.

  • The Massachusetts Psychological Association (MPA) hosts a page of public resources. Topics include understanding your health insurance, accessing mental health benefits, appealing denied authorization requests, and accessing out-of-network services.
  • The Office of Patient Protection assists consumers who are enrolled in a Massachusetts managed-care plan and have questions about or problems with accessing their services. They can help you to understand and navigate the internal and external appeals process.
  • The Mental Health Legal Advisors Committee (MHLAC) is a state-run group that works to “secure and protect the legal rights of persons involved in mental health and retardation programs in the Commonwealth. MHLAC, appointed by the Justices of the Supreme Judicial Court, consists of fourteen judges and lawyers knowledgeable and experienced in mental health law.” They offer legal advice and help to connect adults and children with appropriate resources.

Technological Resources for People with Disabilities: One great thing about the electronic age is the sheer number of websites, gadgets, and other resources available to help people cope with disabilities in school, at home, and in the workplace. This wonderful collection of assistive and educational technology resources, in the form of a wiki, was assembled by Karen Janowski, an occupational therapist with a specialty in adaptive technology and its role in education.

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The resources offered here are for consumer education only. Nothing contained in this site is or should be considered or substituted for medical or psychological advice, diagnosis, or treatment by your own doctor. This site does not in itself constitute the practice of any medical, psychological, or other professional health care advice, diagnosis, or treatment.